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June's Tip: Common Areas For Case Disruption

June's Tip: Common Areas For Case Disruption

By: Dr. William Buckley

After practicing for 39 years and providing orthodontics for thirty years, the best Information I can pass on is: when the intra-case results are not what you expected go back to basics.  For any mechanical technique there are common basics which we all share: Diagnosis, Tooth Movement Progression, Functional Occlusion, and Retention.

April's Tip: How to Run a Successful Orthodontic Practice - Part III

April's Tip: How to Run a Successful Orthodontic Practice - Part III

By: Dr. Mark Paschen:

Introduction:
Treatment Coordinator: (I will refer to the TC as "she" even though there may be many very qualified and talented men out there serving in that role). There are five main responsibilities of the TC. They range from meeting the new patient to getting the new patient to accept treatment.

March's Tip: Evidence of Pineal Gland Calcification on CBCT is Not Insignificant: What Else You Might Discover about Your Patient

March's Tip: Evidence of Pineal Gland Calcification on CBCT is Not Insignificant: What Else You Might Discover about Your Patient

By: Dr. Stacy Fore

Many dental practices utilize a CBCT to examine and evaluate patients. These scans are then evaluated by a radiologist. A review of these reports often reveal that a radiopacity is noted in the midsagittal plane posterior and superior to the sella tursica compatible with calcification of the pineal gland. It is often reported that these findings have no clinical significance and follow —up/clinical correlation is not required. The following paper offers a review of anatomy and purpose of the pineal gland. It is intriguing that this tiny rice-sized gland has such a broad range of functions and influence. Of particular interest with the increase in research and treatment of sleep disorders is the pineal gland and melatonin production. A further review of the literature may encourage practitioners that these calcifications may be of clinical significance and warrant further follow-up.

February's Tip: Understanding and Treating Macroglossia

By: Maria-Cristina Iova

According to the Guinness World Records 2015, the largest tongue recorded in history belongs to Nick Stoeberl measuring 10.1 cm.  Although this seems like an interesting trait, dentists confirm that having a large tongue is disadvantageous. The tongue is a specialized, muscular, and multifunctional organ that is part of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx.' It is essential in speaking, tasting, chewing, swallowing, and facial growth' and has tremendous importance in the airway path. It is particularly important to consider it when doing an orthodontic treatment or in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To understand the complications of a large tongue, the tongue will be first looked at the anatomical level so that the meaning of an oversized tongue and the different types of treatment solutions available to patients with specifically larger tongues can be discussed. In order to help the medical field, dentists need to pay more attention to the tongue by participating in and with clinical studies and publishing observations and information about the tongue, its size, and role in oral health.

November's Tip: Cephalometric Superimposition

November's Tip: Cephalometric Superimposition

By: Dr. Pierre Pellan

The value of cephalometric superimposition resides mostly in its importance in demonstrating the gross effects of a given orthodontic treatment.  For example, superimposing both pre-treatment and end-of-treatment cephalograms provide a fair estimation of the change in the position of the incisors, or the amount and the nature of the displacement of the mandible following class II or III therapy (Figure 1).

October's Tip: Guided Eruption of Impacted Cuspids

October's Tip: Guided Eruption of Impacted Cuspids

By: Dr. Mike Lowry

An issue we are often confronted with in our orthodontic career is the problem of impacted cuspids. As practitioners, it falls to us to be equipped to confront this condition if we are planning to treat these patients. The purpose of this review is to present an option for treatment that will address the problem of impacted cuspids.