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September's Monthly Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part VII

September's Monthly Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part VII

By: Dr. Mark Paschen

This is the seventh in a series of articles outlining How to Run a Successful Orthodontic Practice. In the previous six articles, I emphasized the importance of the receptionist, hygienist, treatment coordinator, and the orthodontic team, plus I presented some simple and cost-effective internal marketing tips and how to communicate more effectively with your team and patients. (1) In this article, I will discuss the importance of social media and give some external marketing tips. I covered internal marketing, and I touched on the use of Facebook in my fourth article, but I want to delve a bit more into how to use social media effectively and what steps you need to take to implement a social media presence in your office. Using social media is no longer an “add-on” or “afterthought.” (2) It had been the wave of the future, but the future is now. Any of you who currently do not have a Facebook page should pay particular attention to this article.

August's Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part VI

August's Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part VI

This is the sixth in a series of articles outlining How to Run a Successful Orthodontic Practice. In the previous five articles, I emphasized the importance of the receptionist, hygienist, treatment coordinator, and the orthodontic team, plus I presented some simple and cost-effective internal marketing tips. In this edition, I will discuss the importance of communication. Too often, we think the product will "sell itself" or that our patients will accept our orthodontic treatment based on their past history at our office. Without pushing our patients into treatment that they may not want (buyer's remorse), we need to be able to convince them of the need for treatment and gently persuade them to want the treatment.

July's Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part V

July's Tip: How to Run a Successful Practice Part V

By: Dr. Mark Paschen

This is the fifth in a series of articles outlining How to Run a Successful Orthodontic Practice. In the previous four articles, I emphasized the importance of the receptionist, hygienist, and treatment coordinator, plus I presented some simple and cost-effective internal marketing tips. In this edition, I will discuss the importance of the orthodontic team, how to get your team to work to its fullest potential, and how to be an effective leader. Once you succeed in accomplishing these three things, you will have more fun at work which will translate into a more productive practice.

April's Tip: Unlocking is the Key to Success

April's Tip: Unlocking is the Key to Success

By: Dr. Michel Champagne

Interceptive orthodontics (Phase I treatment) is not fully accepted in the orthodontic world. Should we look at Phase I Orthodontics as overtreatment or missing a huge opportunity to promote growth normalization at an early age, when it counts the most. Some clinicians have only one goal i.e. a perfect static dental Cl I occlusion (perfect final dental cast occlusion). If we join this philosophy, almost all treatment can be postponed to the early permanent dentition and have a great success rate. SHOULD WE ONLY CONSIDER STATIC DENTAL CASTS OCCLUSION ?

March's Tip: Ricketts 6 Keys of Occlusion, Always a Good Thing to Remember

March's Tip: Ricketts 6 Keys of Occlusion, Always a Good Thing to Remember

By: Dr. Bernardo “Coco” Garcia

1.       The distal surface of the upper 2nd PM contacts the mesial surface of the mandibular first molar.

2.       The lower 1st PM should be in contact with the distal aspect of the maxillary canine

3.       Correct torque of the incisors and interincisive angle near 135 degrees

February's Tip: Diagnosing Patients Dynamically

February's Tip: Diagnosing Patients Dynamically

By: Dr. Michel Champagne

Commented On By: Dr. Allan Macdonald

Many clinicians only evaluate malocclusions in a static position which means in maximum intercuspation. This is not the best way to make a diagnosis and this will probably increase the number of  mistakes. Omitting to diagnose a patient dynamically by looking at the path of closure of the lower jaw from the position of first contact to maximum intercuspation opens the door to misdiagnosis.

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